You’ll pry my Oxford comma from my cold, dead, and lifeless hands.


ohawkguy:

the notebook problem: you see a notebook. you want to buy the notebook. but you know you have like TEN OTHER NOTEBOOKS. most which are STILL EMPTY. you don’t need to notebook. you’re probably not gonna use the notebook anyway. what’s the point? DONT BUY THE NOTEBOOK. you buy the notebook.

(via another-wonderlandd)


pbsthisdayinhistory:

July 16, 1951: The Catcher in the Rye is Published
On this day in 1951, J.D. Salinger’s novel, The Catcher in the Rye, was published. The novel tells the story of 16-year-old Holden Caulfield, a troubled character who challenged 1950s conformity, much like Salinger himself.
Due to its somewhat rebellious tone, Salinger’s work has been linked to issues of controversy and censorship.  Even so, over 60 years later, The Catcher in the Rye has sold over 65 million copies and continues to sell an additional 500,000 each year.
Learn about the novel’s path to publication with American Masters’ J. D. Salinger infographic.
Photo:  A 1951 copy of J.D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye (Rare Book and Special Collections Division, Library of Congress). 

pbsthisdayinhistory:

July 16, 1951: The Catcher in the Rye is Published

On this day in 1951, J.D. Salinger’s novel, The Catcher in the Rye, was published. The novel tells the story of 16-year-old Holden Caulfield, a troubled character who challenged 1950s conformity, much like Salinger himself.

Due to its somewhat rebellious tone, Salinger’s work has been linked to issues of controversy and censorship.  Even so, over 60 years later, The Catcher in the Rye has sold over 65 million copies and continues to sell an additional 500,000 each year.

Learn about the novel’s path to publication with American Masters’ J. D. Salinger infographic.

Photo:  A 1951 copy of J.D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye (Rare Book and Special Collections Division, Library of Congress). 

(via baedekersandbeasties)


I loved you so much once. I did. More than anything in the whole wide world. Imagine that. What a laugh that is now. We were so intimate once upon a time I can’t believe it now. I think that’s the strangest thing of all now. The memory of being that intimate with somebody. We were so intimate I could puke. I can’t imagine ever being that intimate with somebody else. I haven’t been.
Raymond Carver, Where I’m Calling From  (via sad-empty)

(via artificial-fire)


fer1972:

Old Beautiful Books via elfhillbooks

(via clarabolina)



I wish my library would look like: 1/??

(via jamesbuckeybarnes)



beren-and-luthien:

Notable Females:

 Mary Shelley (née Wollstonecraft Godwin) August 30th 1797- February 1st 1851-Born to Mary Wollstonecraft and William Godwin, Mary Shelley was an English novelist and writer best known for her Gothic horror novel, Frankenstein: or, The Modern Prometheus. She married Percy Shelley, who urged her to pursue a career in literature and in 1816, in Geneva, Switzerland Mary Shelley first penned what is now one of the most iconic horror tales to ever have been written. Credited as the creator of the science fiction genre, Mary Shelley was also dramatist, a poet, biographer, and political radical.